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Acrocephalus
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Australian Reed-Warbler, Acrocephalus australis
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon
Unrecognized taxon (fix): Acrocephalus
Species

About 35, see text.

The Acrocephalus warblers are small, insectivorous passerine birds belonging to the genus Acrocephalus. Formerly in the paraphyletic Old World warbler assemblage, they are now separated as the namesake of the marsh- and tree-warbler family Acrocephalidae. They are sometimes called marsh-warblers or reed-warblers, but this invites confusion with Marsh Warbler and Reed Warbler proper, especially in North America where it is common to use lower case for bird species.

These are rather drab brownish warblers usually associated with marshes or other wetlands. Some are streaked, others plain. Many species are migratory.

Many species have a flat head profile, which gives rise to the group's scientific name.

Species breeding in temperate regions are strongly migratory.

The most enigmatic species of the genus, the Large-billed Reed-warbler (A. orinus), was rediscovered in Thailand on March, 2006. It was only found once before, in 1867. It was found also in a remote corner of Afghanistan in the Summer 2009.

List of species in taxonomic order

Reed warbler cuckoo

This Reed Warbler is raising the young of a Common Cuckoo

Fragmentary fossil remains from the Late Miocene (about 11 mya) of Rudabánya (NE Hungary) show some apomorphies typical of this genus (Bernor et al. 2002). Given its rather early age (most Passerida genera are not known until the Pliocene), it is not too certain that it is correctly placed here, but it is highly likely to belong to the Acrocephalidae at the least.

Notes


References

External links

Eurasian Spoonbill This article is part of Project Bird Genera, a All Birds project that aims to write comprehensive articles on each genus, including made-up genera.
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