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| fossil_range = <br>[[Late Cretaceous]] - [[Holocene]], {{fossilrange|66|0}}
 
| fossil_range = <br>[[Late Cretaceous]] - [[Holocene]], {{fossilrange|66|0}}
 
| name= Australaves
 
| name= Australaves
| image = Falco_berigora_-Alice_Springs,_Northern_Territory,_Australia-8.png
+
| image = Australaves diversity.png
 
| image_width = 230px
 
| image_width = 230px
| image_caption = Brown Falcon
+
| image_caption = Diversity of Australaves:
  +
[[Peregrine Falcon]], [[Red-legged Seriema]], [[Cockatiel]], [[Carrion Crow]].
 
| authority = Ericson, 2012
 
| authority = Ericson, 2012
 
| subdivision_ranks = [[Order]]s
 
| subdivision_ranks = [[Order]]s

Revision as of 05:19, November 23, 2016

Australaves
Temporal range:
Late Cretaceous - Holocene, 66–0 Ma
Australaves diversity
Diversity of Australaves:

Peregrine Falcon, Red-legged Seriema, Cockatiel, Carrion Crow.

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Clade: Inopinaves
Clade: Telluraves
Clade: Australaves
Ericson, 2012

Australaves[1] is a is a recently defined[2] clade of birds, consisting of the Eufalconimorphae (passerines, parrots and falcons) as well as the Cariamiformes (including seriamas and the extinct "terror birds").[3] They appear to be the sister group of Afroaves.[3] As in the case of Afroaves, the most basal clades are predatory, suggesting this was the ancestral lifestyle.[4]

Australaves


Cariamiformes (seriamas)


Falcons, parrots, passerines


Falconiformes (falcons)


Parrots and passerines


Psittaciformes (parrots)



Passeriformes (songbirds, crows & kin)





Cladogram of Australaves relationships based on Jarvis, E.D. et al. (2014).[4]

References

  1. ^ Kimball RT, Wang N, Heimer-McGinn V, Ferguson C, Braun EL (2013). "Identifying localized biases in large datasets: A case study using the Avian Tree of Life.". Mol Phylogenet Evol. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2013.05.029. 
  2. ^ Ericson, P. G. (2012) "Evolution of terrestrial birds in three continents: biogeography and parallel radiations." Journal of Biogeography, 39(5): 813-824.
  3. ^ a b Naish, D. (2012). "Birds." Pp. 379-423 in Brett-Surman, M.K., Holtz, T.R., and Farlow, J. O. (eds.), The Complete Dinosaur (Second Edition). Indiana University Press (Bloomington & Indianapolis).
  4. ^ a b doi:10.1126/science.1253451
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