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Lari
Temporal range: Early Miocene–Recent
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Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Infraclass: Neognathae
Superorder: Neoaves
Clade: Aequorlitornithes
Order: Charadriiformes
Suborder: Lari
Shape, 1891
Families

The suborder Lari is the part of the order Charadriiformes which includes the gulls, terns, skuas and skimmers, with the waders and snipes making up the rest of the order. Following recent research, the auks are now placed into the Lari too.[1] Sometimes, the buttonquails are also placed here, but the molecular data and fossil record rather suggests them be a quite basal offshoot along with the snipe-like and aberrant waders.[2]

Behaviour

Pratincoles and coursers are insectivorous eating many kinds of insects, while skuas are carnivorous, jaegers are omnivorous and kleptoparasitic, the Crab Plover is a crab-eating specialist, larids are omnivorous and will even steal food from human hands as well as kleptoparasitic, and auks are carnivorous and will eat fish, jellyfish, crustaceans, zooplankton, worms, mollusks and squid.[3]

Most species are monogamous, having only one mate and most species nest colonially. Murrelets are nocturnal, especially when they're breeding.[3] Many species are countershaded, having white undersides and dark backs.[4]

Taxonomy

It contains the following families:[5]

References

  1. ^ Baker, A.J.; Pereira, S.L.; Paton, T.A. (2007). "Phylogenetic relationships and divergence times of Charadriiformes genera: multigene evidence for the Cretaceous origin of at least 14 clades of shorebirds". Biology Letters. 3: 205–209. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2006.0606Freely accessible.  "Erratum: Phylogenetic relationships and divergence times of Charadriiformes genera: multigene evidence for the Cretaceous origin of at least 14 clades of shorebirds". Biology Letters. 4: 762–763. 2008. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2006.0606erratumFreely accessible. 
  2. ^ Paton et al., 2003; Thomas et al., 2004; Paton & Baker, 2006)
  3. ^ a b Alsop III, Fred J. (2001). Smithsonian Handbooks Birds of North America. Dorling Kindersley. ISBN 0789480018. 
  4. ^ Seabirds and Marine - What are seabirds?
  5. ^ John H. Boyd III (November 10, 2011). "CHARADRIIFORMES". TiF Checklist. Retrieved 1-07-2020.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
Hemipus picatus This article is part of Project Bird Taxonomy, a All Birds project that aims to write comprehensive articles on every order, family and other taxonomic rank related to birds.
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