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Microbiotheres
Temporal range: Early Paleocene–Recent
Monito del Monte ps6
Dromiciops gliroides
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Infraclass: Marsupialia
Superorder: Australidelphia
Order: Microbiotheria
Ameghino, 1889
Family: Microbiotheriidae
Ameghino, 1887
Genus

Khasia
Mirandatherium
Eomicrobiotherium
Ideodelphys
Pitheculus
Dromiciops

Template:More footnotes

The Monito del Monte is the only extant member of its family (Microbiotheriidae) and the only surviving member of an ancient order, the Microbiotheria.[1] The oldest microbiothere currently recognised is Khasia cordillerensis, based on fossil teeth from Early Palaeocene deposits at Tiupampa, Bolivia. Numerous genera are known from various Palaeogene and Neogene fossil sites in South America. A number of possible microbiotheres, again represented by isolated teeth, have also been recovered from the Middle Eocene La Meseta Formation of Seymour Island, Western Antarctica. Finally, several undescribed microbiotheres have been reported from the Early Eocene Tingamarra Local Fauna in Northeastern Australia; if this is indeed the case, then these Australian fossils have important implications for our understanding of marsupial evolution and biogeography.

Although once thought to be members of the order Didelphimorphia (the order that contains the Virginia Opossum), an accumulation of both anatomical and genetic evidence in recent years has led to the conclusion that microbiotheres are not didelphids at all, but are instead most closely related to the Australasian marsupials; together, the microbiotheres and the Australian orders form the clade Australidelphia. The distant ancestors of the Monito del Monte, it is thought, remained in what is now South America while others entered Antarctica and eventually Australia during the time when all three continents were joined as part of Gondwana.[2][3]

References

  1. ^ Template:MSW3 Microbiotheria
  2. ^ Schiewe, Jessie (2010-07-28). "Australia's marsupials originated in what is now South America, study says". LATimes.Com. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2010-08-01.  External link in |work= (help)
  3. ^ Nilsson, M. A.; Churakov, G.;, Sommer, M.; Van Tran, N.; Zemann, A.; Brosius, J.; Schmitz, J. (2010-07-27). Penny, David, ed. "Tracking Marsupial Evolution Using Archaic Genomic Retroposon Insertions". PLoS Biology. Public Library of Science. 8 (7): e1000436. PMC 2910653Freely accessible. PMID 20668664. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000436.  Cite uses deprecated parameter |coauthors= (help)

External links

[1]

Macropus eugenii 2 Gould This article is part of Project Mammal Orders, a All Birds project that aims to write comprehensive articles on each mammal order, including made-up orders.
Sperm whales size This article is part of Project Mammal Families, a All Birds project that aims to write comprehensive articles on each mammal family, including made-up families.
Mammal Diversity 2011 This article is part of Project Mammal Taxonomy, a All Birds project that aims to write comprehensive articles on every order, family and other taxonomic rank related to mammals.

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