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Red-tailed Hawk[1]
Red-tailed Hawk Buteo jamaicensis Full Body 1880px
Adult
Hawk eating prey
Juvenile
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Clade: Inopinaves
Clade: Afroaves
Superorder: Accipitrimorphae
Order: Accipitriformes
Family: Accipitridae
Subfamily: Buteoninae
Tribe: Buteonini
Genus: Buteo
Species: B. jamaicensis
Binomial name
Buteo jamaicensis
(Gmelin, JF, 1788)[1]
Synonyms[1]

Falco jamaicensis

The Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis; BEW-tee-oh jah-may-ih-SEN-sis[2]) is a bird of prey and a member of the Accipitridae family. Its range is found throughout the North American continent, from Canada to Panama.[2] It is the most common Buteo in the US and Canada.[3]

It has two well-known subspecies, called Harlan's Hawk and Krider's Hawk.

Other names

Desciption

The Red-tailed Hawk is usually found to be of the size range of 46-58 cm (for males) and 51-64 cm (for females).[4]

Harlan's Hawk

Main article: Harlan's Hawk

The Harlan's subspecies is a variable blackish subspecies.[5] It is considered a separate species by some.[2][5]

It breeds in eastern Alaska and northwest Canada. Winters in southeast-ward to Texas and the lower Mississippi Valley.[5]

Krider's Hawk

Main article: Krider's Hawk

The Krider's subspecies is a pale prairie subspecies or form, with a white tail that might be tipped pale rufous.[5]

It is found in the prairie provinces of Canada and northern prairie states. In the winter, south through the southern plains to Texas and Louisiana.[5]

Similar species

Behaviour

Diet

Calls

Reproduction

Distribution/habitat

References

  1. ^ a b c Lepage, Denis. "Buteo jamaicensis". Bird Checklists of the World. Avibase. Retrieved 7 September 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c Terres, John K. (1980). The Audubon Society Encyclopedia of North American Birds. Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. ISBN 0394466519. 
  3. ^ Dunn, Jon L. and Alderfer, Jonathan (2011). National Geographic Guide to the Birds of North America. National Geographic Society. ISBN 1426200722. 
  4. ^ Krista Kagume (2005). Compact Guide to Ontario Birds. Lone Pine Publishing. ISBN 1551054671. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Peterson, Roger Tory (1980). A Field Guide to the Birds East of the Rockies. Houghton Mifflin Company. ISBN 039526619X. 

External links

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