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Sylviidae
File:Sylvia atricapilla male 2.png
Blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla)
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Clade: Inopinaves
Order: Passeriformes
Suborder: Passeri
Infraorder: Passerida
Superfamily: Sylvioidea
Clade: Babbler clade
Family: Sylviidae
Vigors, 1825
Synonyms

Paradoxornithidae

Sylviid warblers, Sylviidae is a family of passerine birds that was part of an assemblage known as the Old World warblers. The family was formerly a wastebin taxon with over 400 species of bird in over 70 genera. The family was poorly defined with many characteristics shared with other families. Advances in classification, particularly helped with molecular data, have led to the splitting out of several new families from within this group. Today the smaller family Sylviidae includes the typical warblers in the genus Sylvia, the parrotbills of Asia (formerly a separate family Paradoxornithidae), a number of babblers formerly placed within the family Timaliidae (which is itself currently being split) and the Wrentit, an unusual North American bird that has been a longstanding taxonomic mystery.

Description

They are small to medium-sized, with generally thin, pointed bill with bristles at the base, a slender shape and an inconspicuos and mostly plain plumage. Then wings show ten primaries feather, and are rounded and short in non-migratory species.[1]

Species

Family Sylviidae sensu stricto

True warblers (or sylviid warblers) and parrotbills. A fairly diverse group of smallish taxa with longish tails. Mostly in Asia, to a lesser extent in Africa. A few range into Europe; one monotypic genus on west coast of North America.

Genus Sylvia

Temperate Eurasian superspecies ("atricapilla-borin group")

Afrotropical superspecies

Genus Atraphornis

Genus Curruca

Adophoneus

Parisoma

Curruca clade

"Lesser Whitethroat" complex[2]

Dots indicate new species.

Genus Melizophilus

Now in Paradoxornithidae:

Genus Myzornis

Genus Rhopophilus

Genus Lioparus

Genus Paradoxornis

Typical parrotbills (18 species).

Genus Conostoma

Genus Fulvetta

Typical fulvettas (7 species). Formerly in Alcippe (Timaliidae).[6][7]

Genus Chrysomma

Formerly in Timaliidae.[8][9]

Genus Chamaea

References

  1. ^ del Hoyo, J. Elliott, A. & Christie, D. (editors). (2006) Handbook of the Birds of the World. Volume 11: Old World Flycatchers to Old World Warblers. Lynx Edicions. ISBN 84-96553-06-X
  2. ^ Olsson U1, Leader PJ, Carey GJ, Khan AA, Svensson L, Alström P. New insights into the intricate taxonomy and phylogeny of the Sylvia curruca complex. Mol Phylogenet Evol. 2013 April; 67(1): 72–85. Published online 2013 January 12. doi: 10.1016/j.ympev.2012.12.023
  3. ^ Gelang, Magnus; Alice Cibois, Eric Pasquet, Urban Olsson, Per Alström, Per G. P Ericson (2009). "Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification". Zoologica Scripta. 38 (3): 225–236. doi:10.1111/j.1463-6409.2008.00374.x.  Cite uses deprecated parameter |coauthors= (help)
  4. ^ Gelang, M., A. Cibois, E. Pasquet, U. Olsson, P. Alström and P.G.P. Ericson (2009), Phylogeny of babblers (Aves, Passeriformes): major lineages, family limits and classification, Zool. Scripta 38, 225-236. Article
  5. ^ Collar, N. & Robson, C. (2016). Golden-breasted Fulvetta (Lioparus chrysotis). In: del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona. (retrieved from http://www.hbw.com/node/59391 on 8 March 2016).
  6. ^ Pasquet, E., E. Bourdon, M.V. Kalyakin, and A. Cibois (2006), The fulvettas (Alcippe, Timaliidae, Aves): a polyphyletic group, Zool. Scripta 35, 559-566.
  7. ^ Collar, N.J., and C. Robson (2007), Family Timaliidae (Babblers), in “Handbook of the Birds of the World, volume 12, Picathartes to Tits and Chickadees”, (del Hoyo, J., A. Elliott, and D. Christie, eds.), Lynx Edicions, Barcelona, pp. 70-291.
  8. ^ Collar, N., Robson, C. & Sharpe, C.J. (2016). Jerdon's Babbler (Chrysomma altirostre). In: del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona. (retrieved from http://www.hbw.com/node/59387 on 8 March 2016).
  9. ^ Collar, N. & Robson, C. (2016). Yellow-eyed Babbler (Chrysomma sinense). In: del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona. (retrieved from http://www.hbw.com/node/59388 on 9 March 2016).
  10. ^ Cibois, Alice (2003). "Mitochondrial DNA Phylogeny of Babblers (Timaliidae)". Auk. 120 (1): 1–20. JSTOR 4090138. doi:10.1642/0004-8038(2003)120[0035:MDPOBT]2.0.CO;2. 
  11. ^ Pasquet, Eric; Bourdon, Estelle; Kalyakin, Mikhail V.; Cibois, Alice (2006). "The fulvettas (Alcippe), Timaliidae, Aves): a polyphyletic group". Zoologica Scripta. 35 (6): 559–566. doi:10.1111/j.1463-6409.2006.00253.x. 
  12. ^ Dunn, Jon L. and Alderfer, Jonathan (2011). National Geographic Completely Birds of North America. National Geographic Society. ISBN 9781426213731. 
Sterna diversity This article is part of Project Bird Families, a All Birds project that aims to write comprehensive articles on each bird family, including made-up families.
Hemipus picatus This article is part of Project Bird Taxonomy, a All Birds project that aims to write comprehensive articles on every order, family and other taxonomic rank related to birds.
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